Friday, July 15, 2005

More of that Old Time Religion.

Ok, I admit that I post a lot about religion, especially the really wacky aspects. It might seem to some that I am obsessed with it. It just seems that it has such a power in society and it completely evades any large scale criticism. You can say or do just about anything, express the most insane thoughts but if they have the words "faith" or "God" or "spiritual" attached no one is allowed to laugh or scowl. Wouldn't it be nice if one of these big "inter faith councils" that meet from time to time to make unanimous demands on society (usually to call for more command economy social justice) would spend a couple hours on agreeing on some practices which respectable religions should not engage in. I mean the little things that would separate themselves from cults like demanding that an adherent separate himself from all friends and family that don't join or calling on adherents to bomb unbelievers and OBGYNs who do abortions. Maybe religions could all come forward and give their true position on the separation of church and state and whether they have the same respect for secular people as they claim to have for other "people of faith".

A simple list of 10 or so principles that they feel responsible religions should live up to would be nice.

Thou shalt not promise health or financial miracles on behalf of God in exchange for money or political support.

Thou shalt not demand that books or people be destroyed no matter how ugly they are.

Thou shalt not move to South Carolina in an effort to destabilize the state or the nation.

etc.
That last one is an interesting story. I have heard about it for a while but I guess they could not decide on which state to gang swarm. It seems that when the words "under God" were wedged into the American pledge of allegiance by the Knights of Columbus back in the 50's, they needed to make some room by removing the word "indivisible". This is great for the Christian Exodus crowd. (The Knights of Columbus are the same ones who want the Ten Commandments rubbed in everyone's face when they enter courts and can not stand the idea that there are kids out there at this very moment who are not being forced to pray against their will regardless of what their parents think of it.)

I do not want to give the impression that I am against the Christian Exodus plan. I am all for it. South Carolina is a small price to pay for getting rid of the truly loonie from the rest of the continent. As businesses run like hell, the economies of neighboring states will blossom with the economic refugees and a small number of S.C. residents will be able to make a living selling prayer cloths and holy oil. The rest can wear barrels for clothing and contemplate their good fortune at living in a new Christian nation.

In other news, it seems the Pope has expressed some pre-pontificate worries about Harry Potter. Why is he worried? Benedict has a big stick and Harry has a dopey little wand. He feels that Potter has the ability to undo Christianity. (He does have the mark of the beast on his forehead)

In a letter sent two years before becoming pope, Benedict XVI expressed concern that the Harry Potter books "erode Christianity in the soul" of young people, a German writer says.
Imaginary tales of magic and mystery can cause the end of Christianity eh? Kind of like kryptonite. It looks harmless but put it around Superman's neck and he becomes Superwuss.
Mother Goose and the writings of the Brothers Grimm must have been early Satanic plots that failed because of poor demographic penetration.

It seems the vicar of Christ has been reading a book (Other than the Bible? Way to go you rebel!) which claims that:

the Potter novels blur the boundaries between good and evil.
In the Potter novels it is sometimes hard to figure out who is on the side of good, evil and just out for themselves. We don't want children learning that do we. Sometimes certain members of the authorities are untrustworthy. Most slanderous! The Pope's literary informant...

also asserts that (the stories) glorify the world of witches and magicians at the expense of the human world.

That would be the world of witches and magicians which does not exist! Are these people on crack?!?

The Vatican recently put out its "thoughts" about how horrible it was that people who were disobeying its teachings were taking communion. They then lamented that too few Catholics were attending church. Again I must ask about the crack.

Meanwhile Palestinians are having to decide what kind of role religion should play in their society. The spokesman of a Hamas run Palestinian clearly explains where Hamas' feelings on the issue lie:

"We are not like the Taliban," Sabri said, referring to the Islamic fundamentalists who enforced harsh religious laws during their rule of Afghanistan. "But we respect them (the Taliban) because they chose something suitable for their people."
I am glad they cleared that up.

[sigh...]

2 Comments:

At Fri Jul 15, 10:18:00 PM 2005, Blogger Robert said...

Is there any wonder why a theist like me cannot bear to be associated with modern Christianity? I pose that rhetorical question with your previous post in mind as well.

I would point out though, that there are some thoughtful theologians…I think. Excluding of course, amateurs such as myself, some do take apologetics quite seriously. One of my personal favorites is the late Dr. Walter Martin, who wrote the definitive chronicle of abhorrent sects called The Kingdom of the Cults. Also, his daughter manages the website, which offers some audio files of debates, sermons and lectures. Although Martin and I don’t agree on everything, he’s a far cry from Benny Hinn and his ilk.

 
At Sat Jul 16, 03:57:00 PM 2005, Blogger Apesnake said...

Theology and science and philosophy all have one thing in common - the cream rises to the top but most people draw from the bottom of the tank. (Then they let it sit behind a radiator until it gets clumpy and even the flies won't go near it - have I overstretched this metaphor?)

 

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